Rose Edenfield

Question: Does the Height of a Person Affect Their Walking Pace and Can This Information be Used to Estimate the Height of a Person?

Research Report Findings:
My Science Fair project is whether the height of a person affects their walking pace. Studies show that for 6-12 year olds, girls need 12,000 steps per day and boys need 15,000 steps per day. I will be using a pedometer which is an object that can see how many steps you would take per minute, hour, and day! The word pedometer comes from the Latin word " ped".

Tall humans with longer strides tend to perform better at middle distances. Shorter runners perform better at long distances such as 3,000 to 5,000 meters. I also learned that generally a person that would have longer legs, would be able to take longer strides, covering more ground with each step. The longer each step you take, the more distance you will go while walking, jogging, or running. Research shows that height does have an affect on speed. When your arms are out streached the distance from the tip of one hand to the other, it is usally equal to your height. The length of a person's legs are related to a person's height by ratio, the height of a person will affect how long of a step you take. The measurement of a pedometer is based on the hypothosis that all people have common ratios and proportions, even if they are different heights. This ratio, combined with the motion involved in walking are how pedometers measure distance. Research said that the height does have a major affect on speed because of the legs. The object most affected on height would be the stride length. Most athletes with shorter legs must put more speed in their strides, meaning that they do more strides then a taller person might.

My hypothesis is that the height does affect a human's walking pace because the legs length affects it. The taller the legs, the longer the walking pace they will have. The walking pace is different because it affects how slow or fast you will go. Say you have a person who is 5 foot 2, he would go faster than a person who is 4 foot 9 because of the different walking stride they both have.


Hypothesis: My hypothesis is that the height does affect a human's walking pace because the legs length affects it. The taller the legs, the longer the walking pace they will have. The walking pace is different because it affects how slow or fast you will go. Say you have a person who is 5 foot 2, he would go faster than a person who is 4 foot 9 because of the different walking stride they both have.

Experiment Design:

1. Make a data table in a notebook. Include place to write each persons height. And steps took in 20 feet write down any 10 names/ volunteer number.
2. Find a place to do the experiment (which will be breezeway)
3. Measure 20 feet with tape measure. With sidewalk chalk make a dot from beginning of 20 feet at the end of 20 feet.
4. Find 10 volunteers of different heights.
5. Measure the height of the 10 people. Write down the height using feet and inches in the data table.
6. Tell them to walk at their regular pace from one dot to the other and count the steps they took.
7. Put your data in the chart.
8. After getting data make a chart. Put the number of steps at the bottom and the height to the left. For each person make a dot where the height and number of steps meat. After that, you should have a dot for each of the 10 people.
9. If your dots make a line use a ruler and draw a line. Try to line up the ruler through the middle of the dots. You can use this to estimate the number of steps they take in 20 feet.
10. Estimate my own height from 1 of the dots to the other count the number of steps. Find the number of steps on your graph were it crosses your line best fit place. Put a bright red star on this point. Look to the left and see where your star matches up with this is your estimated height. Write this information on the table.
11. Measure actual height with tape measure. Calculate the difference between them by subtracting one from the other.



Materials:
1. Notebook
2. Pencil/pen
3. Sidewalk chalk
4. Pedometer
5. Tape measure
6. Graph pape
7. Straight edge ruler
8. Bright Duck tape (yellow, or orange would be a good color)
9. 10 people of different heights



Observations as You Perform Experiment: Some of the people had the same height but, a different amount of steps taken in 20 feet. Some of the people were the opposite... some had the same amount of steps taken, but a different height. People who were tall took longer steps, covering more ground with each step. Also people who were shorter took smaller steps covered shorter ground.

Analyze your Data:

click to see graph

Conclusions: My conclusion is the height does affect a humans walking pace. Because their walking pace (how fast or slow you go) affects the speed that they go. In my experiment person1 was 4 foot 8 inches did 12 steps in 20 feet. Person2 was 4 foot 9 inches did 13 steps. Person 3 was 4.10 and took 9 steps. Person 4 was 4.11 and took 14 steps. Person 5 was 4.9 and took 10 steps. Person 6 was 5.0 and took 11 steps. Person 7 was 4.10 and took 11 steps. Person 8 was 5.3 and took 11 steps. Person 9 was 4.8 and took 14 steps. Person 10 was 4.9 and took 14 steps. Person 11 was 4.7 and took 14 steps.

Summary of Project My summary is that I learned that the height, legs, and the walking speed does affect the walking pace. People who are taller and people who are shorter will have different walking pace. The person who is shorter will take shorter steps, and the person who is taller will take bigger steps. So out of this whole project the height does affect the walking pace.

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